New Look: Assisted Living Navigator’s Blog!

Facelift blog 17

We just made color and formatting upgrades to the blog – let us know what you think!

How’s it look?

Content still relevant to your needs?

Anything else we can provide to help ease your journey through the process of finding just the right senior living option for your loved one?

Our Best,

Mark & Michele

Panel Discussion on Senior Housing Trends and Topics

 

Better Living for Seniors – Hillsborough has identified housing as one of the top three issues facing seniors today. Join us Tuesday, May 16 for everything you and your clients need to know about Housing for Seniors. The Communications Committee is proud to present a panel of experts discussing:

  • Available options for seniors; pricing; important   factors to consider
  • Choices in low-income housing; requirements; availability, & how to access
  • Current and future trends, urban planning challenges; future models

Michele Manzo-Lembo  Senior living expert, area representative and local owner, Always Best Care Senior Services; past president, Better Living for Seniors – Hillsborough.

Pilar Carvajal CEO of Innovation Senior Management, works with public housing
authorities, subsidized housing providers and private developers to bring affordable assisted living facilities to the market

Stephen B. Griffin  Senior Planning Manager/Team Leader of the Hillsborough County City-County Planning Commission, holding various leadership roles in the Commission since 1990.

 

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Networking begins at 8:30am

Program begins at 9:00am

Children’s Board Hillsborough

1002 East Palm Avenue, Tampa

Guests are welcome to attend!

 

 

BLS Hillsborough, an initiative of the Senior Connection Center, is open to businesses, individuals and not for profits that work with or serve the senior population. Our mission is to empower members with the knowledge and resources they need to advocate for, provide guidance to and improve the quality of life for older adults and their caregivers. For a nominal membership fee, become a member and improve the lives of seniors while building valuable professional relationships.

Honoring our forefathers and foremothers.

mt-rushmoreOne of the best ways we can honor our country’s forefathers this Presidents’ Day, is to be available on Monday to help with your senior loved one’s housing needs.

As with the men who founded our great country, we should always honor and salute those that founded our families, and gave so much to attend to our upbringing.

As always, we will be available Monday to help answer your senior housing questions.

In addition to our services, our local, Tampa/St. Pete-area network of trusted, associated professionals can assist with elder law issues (wills, advanced directives and power of attorney), coordination of veterans benefits, financial planning, down-sizing and moving – to name a few.

Give us a call, or drop us a line.  We will be happy to help.

God Bless America, and our seniors, too!

 

 

 

 

Where to turn for help with Medicare questions and senior care issues

fancy compass 14

This Saturday, October 8th, 2016, from 9a – 2p, Michele will be providing SHINE consultations at   Grace Lutheran Church’s Health Fair!

 


When faced with daunting life challenges, know there are resources available to help face those obstacles.

Locally, and throughout Florida, SHINE volunteers can help with all questions related to health insurance/Medicare and Area Agency on Aging can help with a great many other issues facing seniors.

That Time of Year: Natural Disaster Planning

FL regions County w Cities

Florida’s Department of Elder Affairs has a great site with resources to help plan for emergency situations like hurricanes and flooding, to name just two.  You can find it here, or click on the link: http://elderaffairs.state.fl.us/doea/disaster.php.

“The Department’s Emergency Coordinating Officer coordinates with the Florida Division of Emergency Management on emergency preparedness issues and post-disaster response. The Department ensures that the Area Agencies on Aging and local service providers have all-hazards Disaster and Continuity of Operations Plans to be implemented during a threat of imminent disaster.

Your safety in a disaster depends heavily on your own actions, and developing a survival plan is the first and most important step.

The sections on the site include:

Disaster Preparedness Guide for Elders

Be Prepared by Planning Ahead

Disaster Online Library

Useful Links and Information

All very good tools to help create and document your emergency preparedness plan.

Summer “Respite” Stay

A “respite stay” is a short-term residency at an assisted living community lasting from a few days to a few weeks.

Included in the stay are: meals and snacks, daily events. programs and entertainment, and appropriate help with activities of daily living (ADLs).  With so many different assisted living communities in this area, there is likely to be a community that can meet your short-term needs.

Respite stays can be an invaluable asset to families that face any of these situations:

  • Family vacation
  • Out of town family emergency
  • Recovery from medical procedure
  • Recovery from a major illness
  • Unexpected business trip
  • Special, or extended, vacation
  • Need for a break to avoid caretaker burn-out

Another use for a respite stay is for a ”test drive” – trying a community for a brief time to see if it is a best fit for the family’s needs.

If you struggling to find a way to care for a loved one and deal with a sudden emergency, a “respite stay” can be an ideal solution and alternative to round-the-clock in-home care.

Contact us at your convenience to find out how we can help you find the right solution for your situation.

Storing Food Safely (3 of 3)

Most important now that we are in Hurricane Season …

Typical hardware transformerWhen You Lose Electricity

If you lose electricity, keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. Your refrigerator will keep food cold for about four hours if it’s unopened. A full freezer will keep an adequate temperature for about 48 hours if the door remains closed.

Once Power is Restored . . .

You’ll need to determine the safety of your food. Here’s how:

  • If an appliance thermometer was kept in the freezer, check the temperature when the power comes back on. If the freezer thermometer reads 40°F or below, the food is safe and may be re-frozen.
  • If a thermometer has not been kept in the freezer, check each package of food to determine its safety. You can’t rely on appearance or odor. If the food still contains ice crystals or is 40 °F or below, it is safe to re-freeze or cook.
  • Refrigerated food should be safe as long as the power was not out for more than four hours and the refrigerator door was kept shut. Discard any perishable food (such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs or leftovers) that has been above 40°F for two hours or more.

Tips for Non-Refrigerated Items

  • Check canned goods for damage. Can damage is shown by swelling, leakage, punctures, holes, fractures, extensive deep rusting, or crushing or denting severe enough to prevent normal stacking or opening with a manual, wheel-type can opener. Stickiness on the outside of cans may indicate a leak. Newly purchased cans that appear to be leaking should be returned to the store for a refund or exchange. Otherwise, throw the cans away.
  • Don’t store food, such as potatoes and onions, under the sink. Leakage from the pipes can damage the food. Store potatoes and onions in a cool, dry place.
  • Keep food away from poisons. Don’t store non-perishable foods near household cleaning products and chemicals.

This article appears on FDA’s Consumer Update page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

Senior Care Progression – in a nutshell

No need for a lengthy post – the graphic sums up the progression very nicely.

If, however, you have questions about how it may apply to your specific situation, we will be happy to answer your questions.

Progression

Storing Food Safely (2 of 3)

ice cube trayFreezer Facts

  • Food that is properly frozen and cooked is safe. Food that is properly handled and stored in the freezer at 0° F (-18° C) will remain safe. While freezing does not kill most bacteria, it does stop bacteria from growing. Though food will be safe indefinitely at 0° F, quality will decrease the longer the food is in the freezer. Tenderness, flavor, aroma, juiciness, and color can all be affected. Leftovers should be stored in tight containers. With commercially frozen foods, it’s important to follow the cooking instructions on the package to assure safety.
  • Freezing does not reduce nutrients. There is little change in a food’s protein value during freezing.
  • Freezer burn does not mean food is unsafe. Freezer burn is a food-quality issue, not a food safety issue. It appears as grayish-brown leathery spots on frozen food. It can occur when food is not securely wrapped in air-tight packaging, and causes dry spots in foods.
  • Refrigerator/freezer thermometers should be monitored. Refrigerator/freezer thermometers may be purchased in the housewares section of department, appliance, culinary, and grocery stores. Place one in your refrigerator and one in your freezer, in the front in an easy-to-read location. Check the temperature regularly—at least once a week.

Refrigeration Tips

  • Marinate food in the refrigerator. Bacteria can multiply rapidly in foods left to marinate at room temperature. Also, never reuse marinating liquid as a sauce unless you bring it to a rapid boil first.
  • Clean the refrigerator regularly and wipe spills immediately. This helps reduce the growth of Listeriabacteria and prevents drips from thawing meat that can allow bacteria from one food to spread to another. Clean the fridge out frequently.
  • Keep foods covered. Store refrigerated foods in covered containers or sealed storage bags, and check leftovers daily for spoilage. Store eggs in their carton in the refrigerator itself rather than on the door, where the temperature is warmer.
  • Check expiration dates. A “use by” date means that the manufacturer recommends using the product by this date for the best flavor or quality. The date is not a food safety date. At some point after the use-by date, a product may change in taste, color, texture, or nutrient content, but, the product may be wholesome and safe long after that date. If you’re not sure or if the food looks questionable, throw it out.
  • The exception to this is infant formula. Infant formula and some baby foods are unique in that they must be used by the use-by date that appears on the package.

This article appears on FDA’s Consumer Update page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

Florida – Definition of Assisted Living Facility

Per Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration:

An assisted living facility (ALF) is designed to provide personal care services in the least restrictive and most home-like environment. These facilities can range in size from one resident to several hundred and may offer a wide variety of personal and nursing services designed specifically to meet an individual’s personal needs.

Facilities are licensed to provide routine personal care services under a “Standard” license, or more specific services under the authority of “Specialty” licenses.

ALFs meeting the requirements for a Standard license may also qualify for specialty licenses. The purpose of “Specialty Licenses” is to allow individuals to “age in place” in familiar surroundings that can adequately and safely meet their continuing healthcare needs.