Meeting the Family Care Needs of Employees

1714-OverwhelmedMomPhone.220w.tnThe need to support workers who provide unpaid care for a family member is a growing reality for employers (large and small).  As the population grows older and life expectancies increase, the need will grow significantly for the next ten to twenty years.

As many as one in six full-time or part-time employees care for an elderly or disabled family member, according to a fairly recent Gallop poll.

The role of family caregivers involves everything from arranging or coordinating, services/support, to navigating the complex health care system, to performing actual care in the home — all while balancing workplace demands and responsibilities.

FL regions County w CitiesEmployers can help families save time and reduce stress – while improving workplace productivity, employee morale and loyalty – by connecting their employees with elder care resources through access to knowledgeable specialists and appropriate providers for family care services.

Call today to arrange a free, workplace educational presentation on senior care services and resources in Tampa Bay.  Or, simply fill in and submit the form below. We will get back to you quickly to see how we can help.

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Senior Care Progression – in a nutshell

No need for a lengthy post – the graphic sums up the progression very nicely.

If, however, you have questions about how it may apply to your specific situation, we will be happy to answer your questions.

Progression

Storing Food Safely (2 of 3)

ice cube trayFreezer Facts

  • Food that is properly frozen and cooked is safe. Food that is properly handled and stored in the freezer at 0° F (-18° C) will remain safe. While freezing does not kill most bacteria, it does stop bacteria from growing. Though food will be safe indefinitely at 0° F, quality will decrease the longer the food is in the freezer. Tenderness, flavor, aroma, juiciness, and color can all be affected. Leftovers should be stored in tight containers. With commercially frozen foods, it’s important to follow the cooking instructions on the package to assure safety.
  • Freezing does not reduce nutrients. There is little change in a food’s protein value during freezing.
  • Freezer burn does not mean food is unsafe. Freezer burn is a food-quality issue, not a food safety issue. It appears as grayish-brown leathery spots on frozen food. It can occur when food is not securely wrapped in air-tight packaging, and causes dry spots in foods.
  • Refrigerator/freezer thermometers should be monitored. Refrigerator/freezer thermometers may be purchased in the housewares section of department, appliance, culinary, and grocery stores. Place one in your refrigerator and one in your freezer, in the front in an easy-to-read location. Check the temperature regularly—at least once a week.

Refrigeration Tips

  • Marinate food in the refrigerator. Bacteria can multiply rapidly in foods left to marinate at room temperature. Also, never reuse marinating liquid as a sauce unless you bring it to a rapid boil first.
  • Clean the refrigerator regularly and wipe spills immediately. This helps reduce the growth of Listeriabacteria and prevents drips from thawing meat that can allow bacteria from one food to spread to another. Clean the fridge out frequently.
  • Keep foods covered. Store refrigerated foods in covered containers or sealed storage bags, and check leftovers daily for spoilage. Store eggs in their carton in the refrigerator itself rather than on the door, where the temperature is warmer.
  • Check expiration dates. A “use by” date means that the manufacturer recommends using the product by this date for the best flavor or quality. The date is not a food safety date. At some point after the use-by date, a product may change in taste, color, texture, or nutrient content, but, the product may be wholesome and safe long after that date. If you’re not sure or if the food looks questionable, throw it out.
  • The exception to this is infant formula. Infant formula and some baby foods are unique in that they must be used by the use-by date that appears on the package.

This article appears on FDA’s Consumer Update page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

Home Care/Assisted Living Cross-over

Cost of LTCRecently updated figures (emphasis, sadly, on “up”) from the annual Genworth Cost of Care Survey.

While every situation is unique and based on its own set of circumstances, note the potential cross-over point around $3,000 per month, where Assisted Living starts to make sense economically.  Certainly an aspect to weigh, but equally important are other medical, emotional and social considerations.  Always consider the complete scope of needs when making this important decision.

Senior Care Terms to Know: ADL and IADL

Assisted Living Navigator's Blog

Activities of Daily Living: What Are ADLs and IADLs?

By Leslie Kernisan, M.D., Caring.com senior medical editor, and Paula Spencer Scott, Caring.com senior editor

Activities of daily living (ADLs) are basic self-care tasks, akin to the kinds of skills that people usually learn in early childhood. They include the following:

  • Feeding
  • Toileting
  • Selecting proper attire
  • Grooming
  • Maintaining continence
  • Putting on clothes
  • Bathing
  • Walking and transferring (such as moving from bed to wheelchair)

ADLs are often mentioned by geriatric-care professionals in connection with instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs; see below), which are slightly more complex skills.

What are instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs)?

Instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are the complex skills needed to successfully live independently. These skills are usually learned during the teenage years and include the following:

  • Managing finances
  • Handling transportation (driving or navigating public transit)
  • Shopping
  • Preparing meals
  • Using the telephone and other communication…

View original post 95 more words

Senior Care/Child Care Benefits at Work?

What are your thoughts on the topic of senior care benefits being available in your employers benefits program?

Please vote, add your comment below, or directly email any questions you may have.

Why Use a Senior Care Franchise?

When selecting a home care service for yourself or a loved one, you may notice that some services are part of a senior care franchise organization. Elderly in-home care is rapidly becoming big business, and, as a result, some companies are forming senior care franchises to provide a trusted brand known for high quality care.  (more at link below)

http://blog.franchisewithalwaysbestcare.com/why-use-a-senior-care-franchise/

What is a “respite stay,” “trial stay,” or “retreat?”

A “respite stay” is a short-term residency at an assisted living community lasting from a few days to a few weeks.  Included in the stay are: meals and snacks, daily events. programs and entertainment, and appropriate help with activities of daily living (ADLs).  WIth so many different assisted living communities in this area, there is likely to be a community that can meet your short-term needs.

Respite stays can be an invaluable asset to families that face any of these situations:

  • Family vacation
  • Out of town family emergency
  • Recovery from medical procedure
  • Recovery from a major illness
  • Unexpected business trip
  • Special, or extended, vacation
  • Need for a break to avoid caretaker burn-out

Another use for a respite stay is for a ”test drive” – trying a community for a brief time to see if it is a best fit for the family’s needs.

If you struggling to find a way to care for a loved one and deal with a sudden emergency, a “respite stay” can be an ideal solution and alternative to round-the-clock in-home care.  Contact us at your convenience to find out how we can help you find the right solution for your situation.