Florida – Definition of Assisted Living Facility

Per Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration:

An assisted living facility (ALF) is designed to provide personal care services in the least restrictive and most home-like environment. These facilities can range in size from one resident to several hundred and may offer a wide variety of personal and nursing services designed specifically to meet an individual’s personal needs.

Facilities are licensed to provide routine personal care services under a “Standard” license, or more specific services under the authority of “Specialty” licenses.

ALFs meeting the requirements for a Standard license may also qualify for specialty licenses. The purpose of “Specialty Licenses” is to allow individuals to “age in place” in familiar surroundings that can adequately and safely meet their continuing healthcare needs.

How to Pay for Assisted Living, part 2

Another excerpt from our Consumer Guide to Senior Living Options.

Costs vary from community to community, and from city to city.  Some charge a la carte for an array of care services using a point system, some charge for levels of care, while others offer only all-inclusive rates whether you need a little care or a lot of hands-on care.  It is important to know what is included in your fees and what is extra.

You can arrange for an in-home assessment to identify if moving into an assisted living community is the right next step for the health and safety of your loved one. 

We will share selections from the Guide, here at the Assisted Living Navigator™ blog, on occasion, but you may contact us at any time for your personal copy

How to Pay for Assisted Living, part 1

Another excerpt from our Consumer Guide to Senior Living Options.

Most assisted living is paid for privately by the resident and/or his family. 

For certain low-income residents with few assets, Florida’s Statewide Medicaid Managed Care Long-term Care (SMMC-LTC) program pays part of monthly fees at a participating facility.  Medicaid LTC program doesn’t pay for room and board but does pay a set amount for care services.  The family of a resident who qualifies for LTC may pay some or all of the cost of room and board without affecting the resident’s program eligibility. 

Not all assisted living facilities participate in Medicaid’s LTC program, and those that participate may limit the number of residents who particpate.

Low-income veterans or surviving spouses of veterans may also be eligible for Aid and Attendance or other benfits from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), which can help pay for assisted living.

We will share selections from the Guide, here at the Assisted Living Navigator™ blog, on occasion, but you may contact us at any time for your personal copy

First: Understand the Level of Care

The first excerpt from our Consumer Guide to Senior Living Options …

Understanding the level of care needed and the amount of time help is needed are two key determinations when exploring care options for yourself, or a loved one.  Medical professionals are often the ones who can formally advise on these matters. But early on, family members can help home health professionals assess, and arrange services for, basic needs.

When the time comes, and living at home is not safe or affordable, then assisted living is a viable solution for many families.  Receiving the same, or better, level of care in a group setting, with its social benefits, can have a very positive effect on a senior’s well-being.  Knowing where, and how best, to start that journey is important to a great outcome.

We will share selections from the Guidehere at the Assisted Living Navigator blog, on occasion, but you may contact us at any time for your personal copy.

Guide to Senior Living Options

Are you suddenly faced with the task of arranging care for a loved one?  And, still you have to manage your family and career obligations?  Where does one begin this new and stressful journey?

Our Consumer Guide to Senior Living Options has been written to provide you with an overview of the two basic options available to families: in-home care and assisted living.  Each has its place in the ‘continuum of care’ and each can help meet the specific needs of most families.

We will share selections from the Guidehere at the Assisted Living Navigator blog, on occasion, but you may contact us at any time for your personal copy.

Where do you start?

Blue DotWith hundreds of Assisted Living Communities to choose from in the Tampa Bay area,  where do you start the search for the perfect living arrangements for your loved one?

The internet may be a reflex choice, but that can be wrought with sites that have just enough information for you to supply your name, phone and email address – in your hope to get some budgetary numbers.  That only leads to your phone and email account loading up with solicitations from people that may have no idea what you are looking for.

Using one of the drug store guides is another likely course of action.  Keep in mind that you will find only a small number of the communities listed in there, and, at best, you will find a web site address (see para. 2) or phone number for you to call.

Other options, like friends, family and co-workers, may seem like a natural choice.  But, do they have the breadth of coverage to know more than a few communities they may have visited?  Do they really know what your family needs?  Do they know what makes a great community?

Why not utilize a complimentary service brought to you by one of the most trusted names in the senior care industry, like Always Best Care Senior Services?  

Their local offices in Tampa and Brandon can provide a matching service that takes the hassle and stress off of your plate.  They have helped families in the five counties surrounding Tampa Bay, and have extensive knowledge of the market.  They will only recommend communities they have personally visited and evaluated.

They will meet with you, get to understand you specific needs for lifestyle, budget, amenities and location.  They will develop, and discuss with you, a short list of communities that meet your needs, AND arrange tours to meet your schedule.  They are there throughout the process to help with any issues that arise before, during and after the move.

Contact them today for your complimentary consultation!

See client testimonials here!

 

Florida – Definition of Assisted Living Facility

Assisted Living Navigator's Blog

Per Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration:

An assisted living facility (ALF) is designed to provide personal care services in the least restrictive and most home-like environment. These facilities can range in size from one resident to several hundred and may offer a wide variety of personal and nursing services designed specifically to meet an individual’s personal needs.

Facilities are licensed to provide routine personal care services under a “Standard” license, or more specific services under the authority of “Specialty” licenses.

ALFs meeting the requirements for a Standard license may also qualify for specialty licenses. The purpose of “Specialty Licenses” is to allow individuals to “age in place” in familiar surroundings that can adequately and safely meet their continuing healthcare needs.

View original post

Senior Care Terms to Know: ADL and IADL

Activities of Daily Living: What Are ADLs and IADLs?

By Leslie Kernisan, M.D., Caring.com senior medical editor, and Paula Spencer Scott, Caring.com senior editor

Activities of daily living (ADLs) are basic self-care tasks, akin to the kinds of skills that people usually learn in early childhood. They include the following:

  • Feeding
  • Toileting
  • Selecting proper attire
  • Grooming
  • Maintaining continence
  • Putting on clothes
  • Bathing
  • Walking and transferring (such as moving from bed to wheelchair)

ADLs are often mentioned by geriatric-care professionals in connection with instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs; see below), which are slightly more complex skills.

What are instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs)?

Instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are the complex skills needed to successfully live independently. These skills are usually learned during the teenage years and include the following:

  • Managing finances
  • Handling transportation (driving or navigating public transit)
  • Shopping
  • Preparing meals
  • Using the telephone and other communication devices
  • Managing medications
  • Housework and basic home maintenance

Together, ADLs and IADLs represent the skills that people usually need to be able to manage in order to live as independent adults.

Doctors, rehabilitation specialists, geriatric social workers, and others in senior care often assess ADLs and IADLs as part of an older person’s functional assessment. Difficulty managing IADLs is particularly common in early Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Assessing IADLs can help guide adiagnostic evaluation, as well as determine what kind of assistance an older person may need on a day-to-day basis.